Performers and Programs

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Performer
Program
Category
Description
Fee
Heitler-Klevans, David & Jenny Hanging Out With Heroes at the Library History,
Literature- Other,
Music
Hanging Out With Heroes at the Library is a special program for the 2015 summer reading program theme of Every Hero Has a Story - an interactive musical performance featuring songs about real and fictional sheroes and heroes, including the likes of Martin Luther King, Jr., Ms. Frizzle, Sacagawea, Spiderman, and many more! Songs telling true stories of unsung heroes many also be included. Two of a Kind gets audiences of all ages involved in the performances through singing, movement, sign language, guessing games and more.
$351- $500
Hopkins, Allen Songs of the Railroad History,
Music
Songs from the 19th and 20th centuries, describing the construction, operation, and history of America's railroads. Main repertoire source: N. Cohen, The Long Steel Rail, U.of Chicago Press, 1982. Examples: Drill Ye Tarriers, John Henry, Wabash Cannonball, Casey Jones, Wreck of the Old 97, Paddy Works on the Railway, Life's Railway to Heaven, etc. Accompaniment on acoustic stringed instruments (guitar, banjo, Autoharp, etc.). History and background is given for all songs. Presented annually for the Brighton schools for 13 years; and recently performed at the Strong Museum (Rochester), Heritage Square Museum (Ontario), Cattaraugus County Museum, New England Folk Festival (Mansfield MA). Performed at Cottrell Mem. Library in Atlanta NY, 2011. Many opportunities for audience participation (chorus singing).
$201- $350
Cavanaugh, Deb Exploring American Folk History,
Music,
Other
Traditional American Folk songs and tunes tracing sections of American history with the use of a U.S. map. I will show the Old Chisolm Trail (The Lonesome Cowboy) and Oregon Trail (Sweet Betsy From Pike), the path of the Underground Railroad (Follow the Drinking Gourd), the Erie Canal and others. There will be opportunites for singing along and creative movement. Instruments will include mandolin, guitar, vocals and traditional American instruments mountain dulcimer, limberjack, and banjo. There will also be a crankie - a traditional American folk art form from the Appalachian Mountains. I will also explain the importance of folk music throughout history. This can be presented with a power point presentaion.
$201- $350
Cloonan, Christopher Cuba, Past to Present: An American's View from Havana History,
Media- Photography,
Multicultural- Other
Chris Cloonan walks the audience through the fascinating history of Cuba- Fidel Castro, Bay of Pigs, Cuban Missile Crisis, to the opening with President Obama and the changes under President Trump. He also discusses his time living in Havana as an American, something rarely seen. He answers your questions about travel, history, and contemporary Cuba. Chris holds an MA in Cuban Studies and recently founded his own Cuban travel company.
$101- $200
Cavanaugh, Deb Call of the Wild: Music of the Klondike Gold Rush History,
Literature- Other,
Music
This program traces the history of the Klondike Gold Rush through the music of that era. Funny, romantic, silly and sometimes tragic, these songs and tunes are presented in costume with anecdotes and a lot of history lessons.
$351- $500
Rosenberg, Paul Colonial Dance History,
Multicultural- Other,
Music
What did people do for fun in the Colonial era? They sang, made their own music, and danced! Are you looking for a way to bring the Colonial era to life? Participants will learn firsthand how people socialized and hear anecdotes from American history. Encourage them to come in costume from clothing they already have – or make their own. Colonial New York and New England was a crossroads of trade, commerce and culture, influenced by Dutch, French, English, African and Native American among many other peoples and traditions. “Multicultural” is not a new concept. The audience will connect with centuries-old traditions and participate in the traditional house party dances as generations of Americans have done – by dancing! Squares, contras and circle dances were brought to American from Europe and Africa. The program includes a sit-down period to talk about the dancing, music, instruments, and cultures. We play tunes, sing songs, and teach about the origins of traditional folk instruments including the fiddle, gourd banjo, mandolin, penny whistle, recorder, and more. More information and video at this link: http://www.homespun.biz/intergenerational-family-dances/ and http://www.homespun.biz/occasions/educational-programs/community-dancing/
$351- $500
Wemett, Lisa Life in the Past Lane: History Along the Highways of NYS History,
Media- Photography
When you’re on a road trip, history is always around the bend. Step into the 1800s to explore the engineering marvels of the Erie Canal and its influence on the development of cities and the women’s rights movement. Tour fascinating homes, presidential sites, and even carousels visited by Lisa Wemett and Terry Mulee in their travels.
$101- $200
Bala, Rich Alexander Hamilton: His Life in Story & Song History,
Music,
Performing Arts- Storytelling
NEW for 2016-17! The award-winning team of folk singer Rich Bala and storyteller Jonathan Kruk (aka The Hudson River Ramblers)present a NEW program using actual stories and authentic songs to chronicle Hamilton's life and accomplishments. This highly interactive, participatory program uses primary sources to tell the story of "the founding father without a father", from his childhood in Nevis to the infamous duel with Aaron Burr. This program was premiered earlier this year at the NY Historical Society in NYC with great success and to much acclaim.
$501- $1000
Bromka, Sondra & John 'The Boy Who Went to Visit the North Wind' Participatory Storytelling + 'Who Has Heard the Wind' Children's Concert History,
Music,
Performing Arts- Storytelling
Sondra and John Bromka bring audiences on a wind-swept journey to 'long ago and far away' with the telling of this fine traditional tale. Look forward to an energetic tandem storytelling performance that is underscored with live music on Celtic harp, enriched with historic authenticity, and alive with abundant participation that is well suited to audiences of all ages. A tale of wonder, magic, and heroism, the story unfolds when a poor boy's meal is unwittingly blown away, taken to the four corners of the earth by the all-powerful North Wind, and cannot be returned. In exchange, a magic tablecloth, magic donkey, and magic stick are three marvelous gifts offered by the Wind. But in the end, the most important gift of all is surely the North Wind's sage advice: 'All you have to do is keep your eyes & ears open.' As in the best of traditional folktales, there is the timeless appeal of a thought provoking theme. Here, justice & fairness are of universal concern to young children. And they will enjoy their favorite storytelling elements: patterns and repetition, personification, and especially, the wondrous and curious ways of 'long ago & far away.'
$351- $500
Fiske, David The Black America Show: The Plantation Comes to Brooklyn History,
Multicultural- Other
After exposing the public to a huckstered version of life in the West--via his Wild West Show--Nate Salsbury initiated a new production in 1895 called Black America. Black America set out not merely to entertain, but to educate the public about the lives blacks had led in the antebellum south. Though the show included some acts that were not typical elements of plantation life--juggling, tight-rope walking, and drills by black cavalry troops--it also featured a village with over 100 cabins where blacks portrayed activities such as picking cotton, operating cotton gins, itinerant preaching, and socializing. Among the singing and dancing performances were examples of black culture that had developed under slavery, as well as newer creations. Show business considerations, as well as stereotypical thinking, resulted in the inclusion of minstrel songs, cakewalks, and tap dancing, but Salsbury's original purpose for creating the show was largely one of public education, and the Black America Show was less exploitative than other contemporary productions. It gave many African-Americans a foot in the door for careers in show business, and increased public awareness of their many skills and talents. Black America had runs in Brooklyn and several other U.S. cities.
Up to $100
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Records  131-140 of 140
* Inclusion in this database does not indicate endorsement of any performer or program by the NYS Education Department, the Office of Cultural Education, the NYS Library or the participating library systems, nor does it eliminate the need for reference checks and appropriate standard screening procedures.

 

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The Performers and Programs website is supported by Federal LSTA funds, awarded to the NYS Library. The NYS Library is a program of the Office of Cultural Education, NYS Education Department.